Parisian Food

I have to make an admission that those of you know me need not read. I am a picky eater. Really picky. Strain my plain  spaghetti sauce because even the little pieces of onion are considered “too chunky” picky. I don’t eat any kind of seafood because fish grosses me out. (same for Garbanzo beans) I don’t eat any kind of peanuts but I will eat smooth peanut butter. I cut every visible bit of fat off my skinless, boneless chicken breasts, and cut out anything else that looks suspicious.

So it will be no surprise that I wasn’t bowled over by the food in France. When I first arrived, I ate Croque Monsieur and omelets for days, despite the fact that I am not a huge fan of ham. I will say that from what I tasted, ham in France is much better than ham in the United States. But after a few days I got tired of it. Bacon is different there too, so I didn’t eat any bacon at all for the 45 days I was there. Now I know how Jesus felt in the desert. (Kidding!)

I never tried escargot, frog legs, nicoise salad, duck, a l’orange or otherwise, fois gras, quenelle, or ratatouille. I did eat plenty of pain au chocolat. In fact, I am a connoisseur of pain au chocolat. I also ate plenty of baguettes, and I totally understand how one can walk 4 or more blocks out of their way to buy a stick of bread at a certain bakery, despite walking by hundreds of other sticks of bread on the way. Towards the end of my trip, I was eating cheese, baguettes, chocolate, and grapes almost exclusively. Washed down with cheap wine. I tried buying relatively expensive (to me) wines but the difference in taste wasn’t worth the expense. I’m pretty easy to please regarding wine. If it’s white, there a 99.5% chance I’ll like it. I tried to eat a variety of cheeses, but kept going back to the same ones, Cantal, Emmental, Parmesan, and Mozzarella.

Here are some pictures of things I ate, as well as many of the foods on display, some of which I ate too, especially the pastries.

First up, street food, which runs right into pastries because WordPress is not cooperating with me:

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Waffle with Nutella. Ok, but too bland after a while.

Waffle with Nutella. Ok, but too bland after a while.

I did not eat this but it seems to be a staple at every crepe stand

I did not eat this but it seems to be a staple at every crepe stand

Some Vanilla thing I ordered to cut the richness of the hot chocolate at Angelina. Not worth the money.

Some Vanilla thing I ordered to cut the richness of the hot chocolate at Angelina. Not worth the money.
Tiny shop on rue Dauphine

Tiny shop on rue Dauphine

Cheesecake from Bread and Roses, rue Madame. Best I had

Cheesecake from Bread and Roses, rue Madame. Best I had

Pierre Herme

Pierre Herme

Trois chocolat at 2 rue de la Verrerie

Trois chocolat at 2 rue de la Verrerie

Restaurant meals:

Cheeseburger from Le Pause Beaubourg, Marais

Cheeseburger from Le Pause Beaubourg, Marais

One of my favorites, but it's Italian so I guess it doesn't count

One of my favorites, but it’s Italian so I guess it doesn’t count

Croque Monsieur

Croque Monsieur

Ham egg and cheese omelette

Ham egg and cheese omelette

The classic croissant

The classic croissant

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Pear Nutella Crumble from Cafe Pre aux Clercs

Pear Nutella Crumble from Cafe Pre aux Clercs

Creme brulee from Cafe Pre aux Clercs

Creme brulee from Cafe Pre aux Clercs

My usual picnic fare:

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I have to mention the wine. It accompanied almost every lunch and dinner, and many times was the only thing I ordered.

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No wonder I came home 14 pounds heavier than when I left. I’m surprised the airline didn’t charge me extra baggage fees!

Pere-Lachaise and Parc des Buttes Chaumont

With the recent heat wave in Paris, I looked for ways to escape, and places with shady trees seemed like a great idea. My first stop was the Pere Lachaise Cemetery in the 20th arrondissement. I followed the Rick Steves walk for this and I recommend that anyone planning this visit do the same as Rick Steves very kindly arranges his walking tour so that most of it is downhill. Upon entering, I witnessed a current funeral in progress. I was a little surprised. It had not occurred to me that this cemetery was still in use, I had assumed it was historical. I quickly put my camera away and walked out of sight of the red-nosed, tissue holding, black-clad mourners and headed for the next stop. There were memorials to countries who had lost men while fighting with France in various wars. Of these, I was struck by the memorial to the Russians of World War II. Notice the many fresh flowers at his feet.

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Next up was Oscar Wilde. Apparently power washed and surrounded by plexiglass, which had only a few lipstick prints on it.

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Just after Oscar Wilde’s gravesite I was accosted by a strange long-haired gentleman, who insisted in some language that wasn’t English or French that I follow him with my camera. He had two other tourists hostage and gestured wildly towards this grave, telling us in broken various languages that this man was the REAL inventor of the Zeppelin. Sadly, I had followed this strange man because I thought he was talking about Led Zeppelin. I was thinking, “I didn’t know John Bonham was buried here”. He isn’t, but this man is.

Joseph Spiess, real inventor of the airship?

Joseph Spiess, real inventor of the airship?

I googled him (Joseph Spiess) and apparently strange cemetery man was correct. Moving on…

I saw Gertrude Stein’s spartan grave, as well as Alice B Toklas, whose name is engraved on the back of Stein’s, although I later learned that she is actually buried next to her, not with her.

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Then came the memorials to the Jews who died in concentration camps. I’ll let the pictures speak for themselves.

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Just around the bend from this area is Paris’s Alamo. Apparently, members of the Paris Commune barricaded themselves inside this wall, but were eventually overtaken and shot in this spot in March 1871.

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I stopped briefly after this to have a small picnic on a bench. Then ventured further on, taking pictures of a few non-famous graves that I found interesting for one reason or another.

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Does anyone else find this disturbing?

Does anyone else find this disturbing?

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Now, I don’t want to alienate anyone here, but I have never really been a fan of The Doors, except for one song, and I just don’t get the fascination with Jim Morrison, so I walked past his grave without pausing. I walked on to Frederic Chopin and met a woman holding the same Rick Steves Paris book I was holding. We laughed and then talked a bit. She was newly arrived and asked if I had done any other tours, and if he was accurate in his recommendations. I told her that I didn’t like Montmartre, but she had been there the day before and liked it even less than I did, as she met a group of women, one of whom had been pick-pocketed and lost quite a bit of money. The only other thing I told her was that the famous #69 bus was just way too hot to ride this time of year. We said our goodbyes and I moved on.

My next stop was Abelard and Heloise, but I have recently learned in school that their relationship was possibly toxic; that Peter Abelard may have been abusive, so I didn’t feel any emotion at the tragic love story. In fact I ignored Abelard, and just looked at Heloise. I wasn’t terribly interested in the remaining graves on the walking tour, so I chose to exit here. It was hot hot hot, and even though I was walking downhill in mostly shade, it had started to feel like work. I got on the Metro and went to Parc des Buttes Chaumont since it was in the next arrondissement. This park was recommended to me by a former co-worker and now Facebook friend (Hi Roger!).

It’s a lovely park, from what I saw of it. Looking at the map, I think I only scratched the surface, although the heat, combined with the hills made it seem as though I had hiked the Himalayas. I took the Metro to the Buttes Chaumont stop and not surprisingly, found the entrance to the park very close to the Metro. I immediately climbed a mountain (okay so it was a small hill) and found nothing at the top but a few benches, that famous Parisian gravel, and lovers hidden in the grasses.

Seriously, there are 6 or 8 people in this picture

Seriously, there are 6 or 8 people in this picture

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I felt a bit like a voyeur, so I trekked back down the mountain and turned left onto a path, which led me past bridges, tons of people laying on the grass, kids playing in a stream…..

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Then another bigger bridge (designed by Gustave Eiffel) leading to the Temple Sibylle.

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I think if I had known the history of this park, I might not have been so eager to see it. According to Wikipedia,  it’s near a place where for around 400 years they used to display the dead bodies of hanged criminals, and then it was used as a garbage dump, a place to cut up dead horses, and to dump sewage. Nice, huh? I’m especially happy that I didn’t know this when I got mis-directed by some badly placed orange barrier fence and ended up basically climbing a dirt hill (along with another poor stranger who made the same mistake I did) to make it back onto a path and had to take off my shoes and shake all the dirt out.

Anyway, here are some views from the temple, including a view of Sacre Coeur.

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And  views of the temple from the lakeside

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A dog chasing fish. I could have jumped right in there with him, it was that hot.

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This is a beautiful park, with drink and snack stands as well as more than one cafe. In fact, on my way out, there was quite a party going on at one of the cafes called Rosa Bonheur. I didn’t get a picture because I was busy dying from the heat and my mountain climbing adventure.

But this park is definitely worth the Metro ride, especially if you pack a picnic, and just buy cold drinks and glaces when you get there.

A Walk Through the 5th After Dark

Another post full of pictures. Maybe it’s the heat, but I don’t have much energy to write. I took a walk tonight to enjoy the breeze, started walking parts of the city I had never been in but ended up in familiar territory. The heat of the day combined with the wonderful breeze brought a lot of people out to party on the banks of the Seine tonight.

The Senate

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Pantheon (undergoing improvements)

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This bar….

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Has an excellent location. The Pantheon to the right

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Notre Dame to the left

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Side entrance to St Etienne du Mont. *Correction. This church is not Saint Genvieve, as originally posted. It is located on Montagne Saint Genvieve, so I thought it was the name of the church. This is also, I found out quite by subconscious prompting, the same steps that were used in the movie Midnight In Paris. Just after I took this picture, I wondered where those steps were and decided to Google when I got home. Apparently my subconscious mind already knew what my conscious mind needed Google to confirm!*

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Front of Saint Etienne du Mont

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Walking towards the Seine

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and Notre Dame

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I Still Don’t Like Montmartre

First, let me say this was not that title of the blog I had planned today. It was supposed to be titled When Bloggers Collide and was going to be about meeting Liberated Traveler. However, she had to cut short her adventures due to a family emergency so please send some good thoughts her way.

I did part of another Rick Steves walk today, starting at #16 in his Montmartre walk, the Moulin de la Galette. As for what happened to numbers 1-15? I saw Sacre Coeur and St Pierre-de-Montmartre (#’s 2 & 3) already on my first attempt at this walk, which was abandoned after my experiences with the “artists” and other colorful characters found at Sacre Coeur near sunset. Many of the other list items are things to look at, and for me not worth all the walking involved. I took the Metro to Lamarck-Caulincourt, made popular by the movie Amelie, but I didn’t enter the famous entrance, I exited an apparently random and unknown exit. I had read about the stairs at the Abbesses Metro stop and been warned to take the elevator, but I didn’t realize this stop had enough stairs to qualify for a warning too. Never fear, there were signs.

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I ignored the elevator as it was full and the sign above said it was about to Depart, when a brave woman barreled past me and leaped through the closing doors and forced them to re-open. As I was already staring at the doors I could see the aggrieved faces of the occupants so I didn’t want to further distress them by again forcing the doors open. (But I did take note for future reference. I had the impression that Parisian doors, like Parisian shopkeepers, have no patience for tourists, and would continue to slam shut on me. Nice to know this may not happen) I walked up some stairs, then walked down a long hallway, and just in case I had forgotten the previous warning about the stairs, the step count was adjusted and new signs warned me that I had more steps in my future.

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I walked blinking like a newborn onto the street and tried to orient myself. I think it only took 10 minutes and half a mile of walking, so I’m improving! Rue Lepic is very windy (that’s wine-dy, not windy as in blowing wind) so if you happen to be taking this walk and you see this guy

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You’ve gone too far. Back up, make a right, and at the next intersection you will find that you have snuck up on the Moulin de la Galette from behind. So if you’re facing the Moulin de la Galette, and want to see that guy, you have to turn right, go up the hill, and he will be on your right.

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Ok, so I saw it. Not much else to say. Continuing, down the wine-dy road, here’s a view down a side street,

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and I saw Henri de Toulose-Lautrec’s house from a distance. Apologies to fans of his but I did not feel it worth the 100 yard detour to look at his exterior windows. I continued on and spotted Vincent Van Gogh’s apartment.

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Apparently in the 2 years he lived here, on the top floor with a view of the city (I’ll have to take Rick Steves word for it because I couldn’t get up to the apartment or the roof and verify), his painting changed. From the Van Gogh Museum website: “Van Gogh’s Paris work is an effort to assimilate the influences around him. As he begins to formulate his own artistic idiom, he progresses through the styles and subjects of the Impressionists. His palette becomes brighter, his brushwork more broken. Like the Impressionists, Van Gogh takes his subjects from the city’s cafés and boulevards, and the open countryside along the Seine River.”

Down the street some more is another Amelie movie locale, Cafe des Deux Moulins. (I really wish I had re-watched this movie before coming here because I barely remember it)

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And finally, at the Place Blanche, Moulin Rouge.

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I guess it looks better at night. Not that I’ll ever step foot in Montmartre at night without a bodyguard. I peeked in the Museum of Erotic Art, which I was surprised to find is less intimidating than Modern Art. Did you know that Degas drew erotic art? I didn’t.

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There’s nothing really bad about Montmartre during the day. I just don’t see the appeal. I’ll stick to my favorite neighborhood, the 6th. I only explored maybe a block of Pigalle as my plans required me to go back the other way past Moulin Rouge again and take a long walk to rue de Rivoli where an Aldo store is located. I am searching for ballet flats to replace the ones I bought at Aldo years ago, but I can’t seem to find any. I could have taken the Metro but I wanted to walk, and I also found myself in front of Printemps, so I went in and poked around, sprayed perfume on myself, looked at lots of pretty stuff….yeah, I’m done. I’ll save shopping for next week when my friend is here.

I was on my way to Notre Dame to do the tower tour, but it’s a really hot day and I am already feeling a little in need of a shower, so I didn’t want to make it worse or offend any fellow tourists on the hot walk up all those stairs to the tower, so another day!

I also saw today that French women wear crocs!

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Afternoon in Epernay

Other than having trouble finding a place to eat, I kind of wish I had gone straight to Epernay. The town itself, what I saw of it, is beautiful, especially the park around city hall. But first, fountain at the traffic circle.

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2013-07-05 18.04.57I walked up “Champagne Avenue” and bypassed Moet & Chandon. I have never particularly liked their champagne, and I was turned off by the way they kind of monopolize the tourist trade here. Plus I thought their tour was was overpriced at 17Euro for one measly taste. There isn’t much or huge signage directing tourists into individual champagne houses, which preserves the beauty of the street, but also led me to walk into a bureau and to fiddle with a locked door before (3rd time’s the charm) finding the Collard Picard Boutique.

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At first I was disappointed because a fellow traveler had visited this town the day before and I loved her pictures of the caves. Collard Picard is about as bright and white as it gets, (check out the lamp, even that has a clear base) but I loved their champagnes. 15€ (Yay! Just figured out how to make the Euro symbol!) for the Prestige tasting, which is three full good-sized glasses of the better champagnes of the house. I honestly didn’t know it was 3 full glasses until they started pouring. I am used to Temecula, California wineries where a small portion is poured into a full sized glass. As I tasted, the woman told me all about the grapes, the area, the “terroir”, where each grape was grown, and what percentage of those grapes were in each of my glasses. My first one turned out to be my favorite, which was a surprise because in wine I am a Chardonnay fan and I liked the blend over the all-Chardonnay.

I thought I would have trouble walking after 3 glasses in quick succession, but I didn’t fall down when I got up (although the door did get away from me when I opened it to leave, lol). I thought I’d better put some food between tastings, so I walked back to the beginning of the street and the tourist information center. The girl there very nicely drew 3 places on my map, and also suggested 2 cave tours that are less popular than Moet & Chandon.

I ended up taking a nice walk all around the area surrounding the traffic circle/tourist area, as all the restaurants were closed until 5PM. The one place open that was on my list to visit was C Comme Champagne, but a quick look at their menu showed only cold dishes of accompaniments, so I moved on.

I did find a nice outdoor seating area at the least favorite of the recommended restaurants from the travel center, but they had what I wanted on their menu, a chocolate banana crepe. They were out of bananas and as it was not only the last restaurant on my list, but also the only open restaurant I could find, I ordered just chocolate and whipped cream. It turned out to be delicious, although I will sit inside next time as I found an ant in my shirt and 2 on my feet! :::shudder:: I detached the little critters, got the check, and got out of there, feeling a bit itchier.

I hoofed it up to the other end of “Champagne Avenue”, made a left and went to the Champagne de Castellane. Remember this tower for later.

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I walked in and asked for the English tour and was told it was starting in 1 minute. Finally my lack of scheduling brought me some luck. The tour was 10€. We were not allowed to take photos of the production. (I believe this is the only house to show the production on a tour) But whenever we were in an area where photos were permitted, our guide let us know.

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The caves are kept naturally at a cool 11 degrees Celcius here, they vary from 11-13 degrees in all the cellars in the area. Humidity is at 85%. The walls were literally dripping with water.

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Our tour guide was very good, and patient. One of the families was Finnish, and our guide waited while the mother summarized everything quickly for her daughter who did not speak English yet.

The underground is much bigger than I imagined. It reminded me of the utilidoors at Walt Disney World. While they lacked the color coded walls of Disney :), they did have actual street names dedicated to different people associated with the champagne house and according to our tour guide, it is quite an honor to have one of these “streets” named after you.The light bulbs are covered with broken champagne bottles.

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All of these caves were dug out by hand, amazing. During the war, many of the caves were bricked up. After the war, they were taken down, but one was overlooked until many years later. A very nice surprise! This isn’t it, but this is what the storage caves look like.

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They had a room full of champagnes from past years, and every once in a while, one of these bottles is taken and finishes production for the owners to taste and compare. We were told to find our year, and mine was not there, which the guide said indicated that all the champagne had been drunk that year. 🙂 There was also a creepy representation of Dom Perignon trying to store his bottles. There were lots of these creepy people, depicting different parts of the process,but I didn’t take pictures as they would give me nightmares.

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After the tour, we of course were taken to the tasting room and given a small glass to taste.

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This was a nice tour, very informative, and it included a trip through the pretty large museum upstairs at our leisure as well as a climb to the top of the tower if we so wished. I did wish, and got some lovely pictures, (the first four are zoomed in) as well as a really very unladylike “glow” of perspiration. Ok, I was dripping sweat, yuck!

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I tied up my hair, which had pretty much been devastated by the humidity in the cellars anyway, and went back down Champagne Avenue once again, towards the train station. I stopped in another tasting room, Paul Germain I believe, and had a glass in their outdoor garden.

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I didn’t like this one as much, and I wasn’t cooling off sufficiently so I went back to the frigid air-conditioning of Collard Picard and cooled off with wet paper towels in their tiny but lovely toilette. Classy bitch strikes again. I ordered a glass of my favorite prestige from my tasting this morning and it was waiting for me when I returned to the counter. I relaxed and enjoyed without listening to the speech, as enjoyable as it had been earlier, as it was nearing closing time and the women were busy counting out their registers. At 3 minutes to 6 I said au revoir to my new favorite champagne and hoofed it down to the train station. I took a few more pictures on the way out.

I wasn’t nearly classy enough to go to Pol Roger.

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These lamp posts look quite threatening.

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DSCN2172Although this little town is beautiful, I was told that there is really not much to do at night. I couldn’t live here then I guess, but it sure makes for a nice day trip out of Paris. Just a 1 hour 20 minute train ride. And for the record, I mentioned this on Facebook and forgot to mention it here. Even though I had 6 full glasses of champagne within 3 1/2 hours, I wasn’t even tipsy. A first for me, as champagne has historically given me trouble.

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No Bubbly For Me in Reims

Today was my train ride to Reims/Epernay. The train to Reims was much nicer than any train I’ve been on so far. The day started kind of blech, with cold temps and a dull grey sky. I hopped off the train at 8:44AM. It’s too early for champagne so I went to the travel center outside the station to get a map, then I was pulled by an unknown force down a small alley and found this restaurant. I would have come back for lunch but the menu, strangely enough, was all burritos, quesadillas, enchiladas, and tacos. Fitting, I guess, since it reminds me so much of Old Town San Diego.

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On to the Reims Cathedral. When the townspeople started building this cathedral, they knew they would never see it completed, they could only hope it would be finished in their grandchildren’s lifetimes. I can’t imagine anyone starting a project like that today, that wouldn’t see completion in their lifetime. I was inside taking pictures and acting like a tourist, I heard a tone, then beautiful singing. There was a group of maybe 20 people, also tourists, standing in the center of the main aisle singing. It was beautiful. I started to record it, but soon had to shut off the camera, and I just sat at the base of a column and let some tears leak out. It wasn’t so much a religious experience as one of beauty. The singers stopped and became tourists again, walking around snapping photos. I loved the window just above the door

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DSCN2031The Marc Chagall windows at the back of the church.

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The ceiling

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The rose window, which is the original glass from 1255, although it was removed during WWI to save it.

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Some windows that were damaged in the war were replaced by the champagne makers in the area, and show harvesting scenes.

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This is actually a historically important cathedral, as most of the kings of France were crowned here after 1027. Joan of Arc famously led Charles VII here. Almost forgot, here are some pics of the outside.

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Beside the church and about a block away is a library donated by one of my favorite Scotsmen, Andrew Carnegie.

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Beautiful Art Deco.

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Chandelier.

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Now I have never seen such a huge card catalog, nor such a pretty one.

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Now that some morning has gone by, I decided to sip some champagne. Unfortunately the travel center in front of the cathedral was so busy that by the time they made my reservation, left me standing at the counter waiting to pay, while an intern said she couldn’t do anything, watching her colleague run all around yelling at people, I finally told them I thought there wasn’t any more time for me to get to the champagne house. The woman apologized profusely, saying she has been trying to get help all morning, but…I have a train to catch and taking the next tour is cutting it too close. By now I’m hungry so I walked to the main drag with all the restaurants and decided on an Italian place I saw earlier. I couldn’t help it, they had a gorgonzola pasta and I couldn’t resist.

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After I ate, I walked to the Museum of the Surrender, to see the actual room where the Germans signed the surrender papers to begin the end of WWII. Apparently there’s a ticker tape of the news, and the walls still have maps with troop positions. Unfortunately I didn’t notice that it closes from 12-2 so I could only photograph the building. 😦

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On the way back I swung by the Porte de Mars, a Roman gate from the 2nd century. The. Second. Century! Sorry, but as a history geek, this stuff really thrills me. It was one of 4 gates into the city and the only one left standing after WWI. You can see the different levels of construction by the deterioration of the columns.

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My time in Reims was strange. Usually I am a planner, but being on an extended journey (56 days), it can become all planning and no doing if I’m not careful. This was the closest trip to the city and I had had the itch to travel for a while so I planned it last minute and didn’t have time to obsess over schedules and such. 🙂 I think I paid the price, not getting to do 2 of the 3 things I wanted to do there, but I did see enough to know that I am not interested in going back. Here are some random shots I took around the city.

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Epernay is another story, and another blog post. It’s 12:30PM already and I don’t want to stay inside all day writing.

I Wonder If Rodin’s Friends Called Him A-Rod

 

My rock star status didn’t last long. Paris kicked my ass last night, but I don’t want to talk about that. I want to talk about plans! I have been researching, and searching the web for day trips out of Paris for a while and every time I search, the prices go up. So because I don’t have a printer, I took a trip to the Montparnasse train station last night to buy my tickets. Unfortunately, the automated ticket booths are the kind that don’t take American credit cards because they don’t have a chip in them. (I actually tried to get one of these credit cards before I left home but wasn’t able to) So today I woke up and went back to Montparnasse station. I had my research with me; a list of what calendar days had the most reasonable prices to the three towns I want to see. I had to wait a little extra for a window designated “English” (by a little British flag in the corner of the monitor). I can speak some French, but certainly not enough to explain what I was trying to do, and more importantly, not enough to understand what is being explained to me.

I got a really nice and patient woman who went above and beyond to help me. I felt really bad for all the people on line behind me because this transaction took over 20 minutes. There were 4-5 windows open, but only 2 designated English speaking. I started by telling her what date I wanted to travel to Mont St Michel and when her price came up 102 Euro more than mine, she started researching for me. She explained that while the web has the 15 day price search, her computer doesn’t and talked about how many people show up insisting on the price they saw. In my case, (she researched even though I told her I believed her and it was okay) the price didn’t include the bus from the train station to Mont St Michel (an 1:15 ride, so a considerable part of the journey). Also, the outbound train at the low price was arriving in Mont St Michel at 11:45PM. The morning trains were about 60 Euro more.
So she found me some mid-week trains to Mont St Michel and Dijon at good prices, then I also booked a trip to Reims tomorrow. I could have saved a little by booking ahead but the Reims trip would be either the day before or the day after Mont St Michel and I didn’t want to cluster my day trips one after the other when I have 40 days to work with. Since Reims was the shortest distance from Paris, it was the logical trip to pay full fare on. Even then, she did find me a reduced rate, but asked if I minded connecting in Epernay on the way home. I definitely didn’t as I had planned to go to Reims, then Epernay anyway, so she adjusted the times to give me enough time to enjoy Epernay before making my connection. She also had definite ideas about how long I should spend in each place. For example when I said I’d like a 9Pm train back from Dijon, she told me, no I didn’t, and put me on an earlier train, lol. When I asked if my return time from Mont St Michel was late enough, she said yes, that I won’t want to be there longer than that, lol. So thanks to this very helpful woman, I have trips planned to Reims, Epernay, Dijon, and Mont St Michel. I can’t wait! On the way out of the station I saw these cute, unused, charging stations for your electronics. You have to pedal to power the chargers.
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After that, I hopped back on the Metro and went to the Rodin Museum. I like Rodin, but I feel like I have seen so many of his works in so many other museums, and a quick look at my guidebook told me the three main sculptures I was interested in are in the garden, which costs 1 Euro, as opposed to 9 Euro for the whole museum, So, you can guess that I jumped on the chance to save 8 Euro! The Burghers of Calais
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Most of the garden was closed off for renovations, but the edges were accessible, as was most of the sculpture, which is what I’m here to see anyway. The Thinker was set up so high that it can’t really be studied in any depth, but it would be hard to anyway as there was a steady stream of people posing just like him in front of it.
“No, no…like this!”
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I like the details of it when seen separately, rather than seeing the whole from a distance anyway.
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After leaving Rodin’s I walked back to my neighborhood, picking up some munchies on the way. And taking a few pictures…
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Now I’m off to the laundromat, and a cup of cafe creme and people-watching while I wait for my clothes. 🙂